The Future is Bright for Stem Cell Treatments

Considering the many emerging research studies on possible cord blood and cord tissue stem cell use, the future of stem cell treatments is very bright. Only the surface has been scratched when it comes to discovering the potential of these cells to treat diseases and disorders. New technologies that allow for the expansion of cord blood cells means that effective autologous therapy will be achievable well into adulthood. Additionally, research has shown that cord blood stem cells can also be effectively used for regeneration or repair, of non-hematopoietic tissues, such as the repair of joint damage through cartilage regeneration. Studies have also demonstrated that these cells are effective at modulating/reducing inflammation, and in the treatment of neurological disorders (ie. ALS, Alzheimer’s Disease, Stroke) that can occur later in life. Keeping up with the latest news inspires hope in the future.



Latest News

Two-year-old gets windpipe made from her own stem cells

Two-year-old Hannah Warren was born without a windpipe and has been unable to talk, swallow, or eat on her own. Her only hope was an artificial windpipe; an experimental device. Her medical team custom-designed a new windpipe using tiny plastic fibers. It was then bathed in stem cells taken from Hannah's bone marrow to promote tissue growth.

Read More


Cord Blood-Derived Stem Cells – a New Therapeutic Option for Brain Disorders?

One particular challenge has been to force cord blood stem cells to become anything other than a blood cell. Researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in collaboration with scientists in Barcelona, Spain, have succeeded in coaxing stem cells to become neurons, a groundbreaking step in the treatment of traumatic brain injury.

Read More


Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells: Prime Source for Transplants and Future Regenerative Medicine

The 5th ITERA Life-Sciences Consortium Symposium showcased the progress of stem cell research and promising therapeutic applications. Thanks to solid scientific data, researchers confirmed that umbilical cord blood stem cells are one of the prime sources to be used in current stem cell transplants, ongoing research and future regenerative medicine.

Read More


Transplantation of porcine umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease

A study compared mesenchymal stem cells derived from umbilical cord matrix (UCM-MSCs) with bone marrow (BM-MSCs) of miniature pigs on their phenotypic profiles and ability to differentiate in vitro into osteocytes, adipocytes and neuron-like cells. This study further evaluated the therapeutic potential of UCM-MSCs in a mouse Parkinson's disease model. 

Read More


Improvement in Cardiac Function following Transplantation of Human Umbilical Cord Matrix-Derived Mesenchymal Cells

Human umbilical cord mesenchymal cells (hUCM) can be easily obtained and processed in a laboratory. These cells may be considered as a suitable source in the repair of heart failure diseases.The findings demonstrated the potential therapeutic use of huCM in treatment of heart failure conditions. 

Read More


Umbilical cord holds key to heart repair: Study

In a new study, published in the journal Stem Cell Reviews & Reports, U.K. scientists took cells from umbilical cord blood, expanded them sevenfold and grew them into cardiac heart muscles. Their research suggests that stem cells derived from cord blood banks might be used for repair after a heart attack.

Read More


Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, generation of induced pluripotent stem cells and isolation of endothelial progenitors from 21- to 23.5 year cryopreserved cord blood

Cryopreservation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) is crucial for cord blood (CB) banking and transplantation. We evaluated recovery of functional HPC cryopreserved as mononuclear or unseparated cells for up to 23.5 years compared with prefreeze values of the same CB units.

Read More


A low frequency of pancreatic islet insulin-expressing cells derived from cord blood stem cell allografts in humans

Umbilical cord blood cells do have the capacity to migrate to the pancreatic islet and differentiate into insulin-expressing cells in humans. This is in contrast to the absence of insulin-expressing cells with an opposite-sex complement of sex chromosomes present in human pancreas after prior bone marrow transplant, when the same methods were used as here.

Read More


Enhanced cord blood stem cell transplants safe in long-term studies

An innovative experimental treatment for boosting the effectiveness of stem-cell transplants with umbilical cord blood has a favorable safety profile in long-term animal studies, report scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Children's Hospital Boston.

Read More


Cord blood stem cells used to help cure girl of brain cancer in Spain

A four-year-old girl, diagnosed with a rare form of brain cancer, became the first patient in Spain to recover from brain cancer after being treated with stem cells from her own umbilical cord blood. The use of stem cells to regenerate the blood system is an extended treatment for this form of cancer.

Read More


|<<1 2 3 4 5>>|